Ayn Rand Biography, Age, Net Worth, Husband, family, children, Philosophy, Books, Movies and Quotes

Ayn Rand was a famous Russian- American novelist, philosopher, screenwriter and Conservative/ Libertarian political activist who most famously wrote The Fountainhead (1943) and Atlas Shrugged (1957). She was born on 2 February 1905 in Saint Petersburg, Russian, into an affluent Jewish family. Ayn Rand, original name Alissa Zinovievna Rosenbaum. She is best known for being a Novelist. She is also known for developing a philosophical system called Objectivism. Rand died in New York City on 6 March 1982.

Name Ayn Rand
Also Known AsAlissa Zinovievna Rosenbaum
Date of birth2 February 1905
Birth placeSaint Petersburg, Russia
Sun signAquarius
Date of death6 March 1982
Death placeManhattan, New York, United States
Cause of deathHeart Failure
Diseases & DisabilitiesDepression
Age (at the time of death)77
OccupationNovelist
NationalityAmerican, Russian
CitizenshipRussian Empire (1905-1917),Russian Republic (1917),Russian SFSR (1917-1922),Soviet Union (1922-1931),United States (1931-1982)

Ayn Rand Family –

FatherZinovy Zakharovich Rosenbaum
MotherAnna Borisovna (Nèe Kaplan)
SiblingsEleanor’s Drobysheva

Ayn Rand Relationship and More –

Marital statusMarried
SpouseFrank O’ Connor
Marriage Date15 April 1929

Ayn Rand Net Worth –

Ayn Rand is a Novelist, who had a net worth of $1.5 Million – $5.5 Million before her death. Ayn Rand’s income source is mostly from being a successful Novelist.

Net worth$1.5 Million – $5.5 Million
Source of IncomeNovelist

Ayn Rand Trivia –

  • Her philosophy of rational self-interest pervades her literary work.

Ayn Rand Early Life and Childhood –

Ayn Rand was born Alissa Rosenbaum on 2 February 1905 in Saint Petersburg, Russian Empire. Rand was raised in an upper-middle-class, European- oriented family, in the midst of the mysticism and nationalism of Russia. Her father Zinovy Her father Zinovy Zakharovich Rosenbaum was the owner of a pharmacy. Her mother’s name was Anna Borisovna (née Kaplan). Alisa was the eldest of her parents’ three daughters.

She did her initial schooling at the prestigious ‘Stoiunina Gymnasium’ and started writing from the age of eight. Although her parents tried to shield the girls from the political upheaval that was taking shape at that time, Alisa gradually developed her own views and favored a republican government over constitutional monarchy. At the age of 9, Rand decided to become a writer, inspired especially by Victor Hugo’s novels. Therefore, when the ‘February Revolution’ erupted in Saint Petersburg in 1917, the 12-year-old Alisa favored Alexander Kerensky over Tsar Nicholas II. However, as the ‘October Revolution’ started later in the year, their family life was totally disrupted. As the Bolsheviks seized power, her father’s business was confiscated and they had to flee to the Crimea, where they tried to start life afresh. Four years later, as Alisa graduated from high school at the age of 16. 

Ayn Rand | Biography, Books, & Facts | Britannica

When Rand and her family returned from the Crimea, she entered the University of Petrograd to study philosophy and history, graduating in 1924. Subsequently, she entered the ‘State Institute for Cinema Arts’ to study screenwriting, graduating from there in 1925. She left Russia on January 17, 1926. After several stops in different western European cities, Rand arrived in New York City on February 19, 1926 and was mesmerized by the Manhattan skyline. She then traveled to Chicago and stayed with one of her relatives. Since she had already decided to remain permanently in the US and become a screenwriter, she spent the next six months learning English and watching movies to improve her language and develop ideas. During this period, Rand produced her first formal writings, essays about Hollywood, published in 1999 by The Ayn Rand Institute Press as Russian Writings on Hollywood.

Ayn Rand Personal Life –

In 1927, Ayn Rand met Frank O’Connor, an aspiring actor, on the sets of ‘The King of Kings.’ They got married on April 15, 1929 and remained together till his death in 1979. The couple did not have any children.

Rand was a heavy smoker, as a result of which, she had lung cancer in the early-1970s. In 1974, she underwent an operation. Despite suffering from the disease, she remained an active lecturer till 1981. On 6 March 1982, she died of heart failure at her home in New York City. However, her legacy still lives on. ‘The Ayn Rand Institute’ (ARI), a non-profit think-tank in Irvine, California, continues to promote her philosophy.

Apart from the books that were published in her lifetime, several other books, including ‘The Letters of Ayn Rand’ (1995) were published posthumously. These books continue to influence readers all around the world.

Ayn Rand Career –

In the middle of 1926, Ayn Rand left for Hollywood, where she took up odd jobs to sustain herself. After struggling for several years at various non-writing Jobs. One day, as she was standing at the door of a studio, she spotted Cecil B. DeMille, one of Hollywood’s leading directors, and just kept on staring at him. Cecil also noticed her and asked her why she was staring at him. She told him that she was from Soviet Russia and had come here with the hope of becoming a screenwriter. Impressed, he appointed her as an extra in his on-going project ‘The King of Kings.’

Rand became a permanent US resident in July 1929 and an American citizen on March 3, 1931. Meanwhile, she began working first as a script reader and then as a junior script writer for DeMille. Success eluded her and she kept on doing odd jobs to sustain her career as a scriptwriter. Titled ‘Red Pawn,’ it was the first screenplay that she was able to sell. Although it was purchased by ‘Universal Pictures’ in 1932, it was never made into a film. Rand saw her first stage play, Night of January 16th, produced in  Hollywood in 1934 and then on Broadway in 1935. Her first novel, We the Living, was completed in 1933. The most autobiographical of Rand’s novels, We the Living, was rejected as too anti-communist and was not published in the United States until 1936. In 1937, Rand devoted a few weeks to write her novella Anthem, which was soon published in England but was not published in the United States until 1947, ten years later. 

Although positively reviewed, neither We the Living nor Anthem garnered high sales. Not until the publication of The Fountainhead did Ayn Rand achieve fame. Rand began writing The Fountainhead in 1935, taking Seven years to complete the book. “The Fountainhead was rejected by 12 publishers but she did not lose hope and was finally accepted by Bobbs-Merrill. Although published in 1943, The Fountainhead made history by becoming a best seller two years later, through word-of-mouth, and it gained for its author lasting recognition as a champion of individualism. 

Has Ayn Rand's day as a business guru finally passed? - Los Angeles Times

Ayn Rand returned to Hollywood in late 1943 to write the screenplay for The Fountainhead, but wartime restrictions delayed production until 1948. While working part-time as a screenwriter producer Hal Wallis, Rand wrote such scripts as Love Letters and You Came Along, and she began her major novel, Atlas Shrugged, in 1946. In 1951, she moved to New York and began to work full time on ‘Atlas Shrugged.’ Concurrently, she continued with her political activism and gathered a big circle of admirers around her.

The book ‘Atlas Shrugged’ was finally published in 1957. In spite of attracting many negative reviews, the book became a bestseller. After that, she did not write fiction anymore. Throughout the 1960s and 1970s, Ayn Rand concentrated on developing her philosophy, which she termed ‘Objectivism.’ She wrote numerous essays and gave lectures at well-known universities on the subject, influencing many young people. Later, these essays and lectures became the basis of her non-fiction works. In 1961, she published her first non-fiction book ‘For the New Intellectual.’ ‘Philosophy: Who Needs It,’ which was published in 1982, was her last book in this genre.

Ayn Rand Books

Novels:
  • 1936 We the Living
  • 1943 The Fountainhead
  • 1957 Atlas Shrugged
Other fiction:
  • 1934 Night of January 16th
  • 1938 Anthem
  • 2015 Ideal
Non-fiction:
  • 1961 For the New Intellectual
  • 1964 The Virtue of Selfishness
  • 1966 Capitalism: The Unknown Ideal
  • 1969 The Romantic Manifesto
  • 1971 The New Left: The Anti-Industrial Revolution
  • 1979 Introduction to Objectivist Epistemology
  • 1982 Philosophy: Who Needs It

Ayn Rand Inspirational & Motivational Quotes

  • Throughout the centuries there were men who took first steps, down new roads, armed with nothing but their own vision. – Ayn Rand
  • A building has integrity just like a man. And just as seldom. – Ayn Rand
  • Money is only a tool. It will take you wherever you wish, but it will not replace you as the driver. – Ayn Rand
  • Civilization is the progress toward a society of privacy. The savage’s whole existence is public, ruled by the laws of his tribe. Civilization is the process of setting man free from men. – Ayn Rand
  • Every man builds his world in his own image. He has the power to choose, but no power to escape the necessity of choice. – Ayn Rand
  • Achievement of your happiness is the only moral purpose of your life, and that happiness, not pain or mindless self-indulgence, is the proof of your moral integrity, since it is the proof and the result of your loyalty to the achievement of your values. – Ayn Rand
  • A creative man is motivated by the desire to achieve, not by the desire to beat others. – Ayn Rand
  • We are fast approaching the stage of the ultimate inversion: the stage where the government is free to do anything it pleases, while the citizens may act only by permission; which is the stage of the darkest periods of human history, the stage of rule by brute force. – Ayn Rand
  • Money is the barometer of a society’s virtue. – Ayn Rand
  • Upper classes are a nation’s past; the middle class is its future. – Ayn Rand
  • The truth is not for all men, but only for those who seek it. – Ayn Rand
  • Individual rights are the means of subordinating society to moral law. – Ayn Rand
  • Potentially, a government is the most dangerous threat to man’s rights: it holds a legal monopoly on the use of physical force against legally disarmed victims. – Ayn Rand
  • God… a being whose only definition is that he is beyond man’s power to conceive. – Ayn Rand
  • To say ‘I love you’ one must first be able to say the ‘I.’ – Ayn Rand
  • So you think that money is the root of all evil. Have you ever asked what is the root of all money? – Ayn Rand
  • When I die, I hope to go to Heaven, whatever the Hell that is. – Ayn Rand
  • Government ‘help’ to business is just as disastrous as government persecution… the only way a government can be of service to national prosperity is by keeping its hands off. – Ayn Rand
  • To achieve, you need thought. You have to know what you are doing and that’s real power. – Ayn Rand
  • Happiness is that state of consciousness which proceeds from the achievement of one’s values. – Ayn Rand
  • The only power any government has is the power to crack down on criminals. Well, when there aren’t enough criminals, one makes them. One declares so many things to be a crime that it becomes impossible for men to live without breaking laws. – Ayn Rand
  • I don’t build in order to have clients. I have clients in order to build. – Ayn Rand
  • The ladder of success is best climbed by stepping on the rungs of opportunity. – Ayn Rand
  • When man learns to understand and control his own behavior as well as he is learning to understand and control the behavior of crop plants and domestic animals, he may be justified in believing that he has become civilized. – Ayn Rand
  • Reason is not automatic. Those who deny it cannot be conquered by it. Do not count on them. Leave them alone. – Ayn Rand

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